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Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Week 6





In-class exercise:

  • apple or orange
  • Target or Wal-Mart
  • Red or blue
  • purple or violet
  • Mac or PC
  • Japanese or Chinese
  • Jew or Gentile
  • Protestant or Catholic
  • journey or destination
  • left to right, or right to left
  • clockwise or counterclockwise
  • kiki or bouba
  • big picture or little picture
  • English or math
  • rock or country
  • jazz or rap
  • immigrant or native

  • ---Matrix Revolutions...ending:

    Click here to watch all 4 parts at once..


    OR
    Part 1 (click here)
    (Check the cross over Neo's head at 1:26 at that click)
    -----------------------
    Part 2: is embedded below..
    Check the crosses at 2:00 amd 2:56
    What Scripture at  3:15?


    --
    part 3Here


    part 4:


      


    ...........



    -------

      

An interviewer once asked the Wachowski Brothers, creators of The Matrix trilogy if all the biblical allusions and references people spot in the movies were intentional.

I am guessing many fans were anxious for the  (hardly orthodox Christian) brothers to deny or at least defuse such expectations 
  

They said something like:

 "Yes, and there are more than anyone knows!"


As examples, just trace the license platereferences,

and the Nebuchaddnezzar's plaque.


    see also:


    --

    Christus Victor (Christ the Victor) is a view of the atonement taken from the title of Gustaf Aulén’s groundbreaking book, first published in 1931, where he drew attention back to the early church’s Ransom theory. In Christus Victor, the atonement is viewed as divine conflict and victory over the hostile powers that hold humanity in subjection. Aulén argues that the classic Ransom theory is not so much a rational systematic theory as it is a drama, a passion story of God triumphing over the powers and liberating humanity from the bondage of sin. As Gustav Aulén writes, “the work of Christ is first and foremost a victory over the powers which hold mankind in bondage: sin, death, and the devil.”[1]
    The Ransom Theory was predominant in the early church and for the first thousand years of church history and supported by all Greek Church Fathers from Irenaeus to John of Damascus. To mention only the most important names Origen, Athanasius, Basil the Great, Gregory of Nyssa, Gregory of Nazianzus, and John Chrysostom. The Christus Victor view was also dominant among the Latin Fathers of the Patristic period including Ambrose, Augustine, Leo the Great, and Gregory the Great.
    A major shift occurred when Anselm of Canterbury published his Cur Deos Homo around 1097 AD which marks the point where the predominate understanding of the atonement shifted from the ransom theory to the Satisfaction Doctrine in the Roman Catholic Church and subsequently the Protestant Church. The Eastern Orthodox Church still holds to the Ransom or Christus Victor view. This is built upon the understanding of the atonement put forward by Irenaeus, called “recapitulation”.[2]
    As the term Christus Victor indicates, the idea of “ransom” should not be seen in terms (as Anselm did) of a business transaction, but more of a rescue or liberation of humanity from the slavery of sin. Unlike the Satisfaction or Penal-substitution views of the atonement rooted in the idea of Christ paying the penalty of sin to satisfy the demands of justice, the Christus Victor view is rooted in the incarnation and how Christ entered into human misery and wickedness and thus redeemed it. Irenaeus called this “Recapitulation” (re-creation). As it is often expressed: “Jesus became what we are so that we could become what he is”.  LINK
     --
    Where  else does a "Christus Victor": show up in literature/film?
    C.S. Lewis, "The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe" :


    See:

    The Beautiful Victory of the Cross and the Table of Aslan Table of Aslan


    The Ransom Theory

    The ransom theory is the oldest atonement theory. It is sometimes called the classical theory or the bargain theory. It was developed and articulated by early church fathers such as Irenaeus, Origen, and Augustine. The ransom theory holds that when Adam and Eve sinned, they placed themselves under the dominion of Satan. To free humanity, Jesus gave himself as payment to Satan. Satan agreed to the deal, and put Jesus to death in place of humanity. Yet since Jesus was without sin, Satan overstepped his bounds. Jesus rose from the dead, liberated humanity, and conquered Satan and his kingdom.

    In explaining the Ransom Theory, Pope Gregory the Great wrote:
    matching deceit with deceit, Christ frees man by tricking the devil into overstepping his authority. Christ becomes a “fishhook”: his humanity is the bait, his divinity the hook, and Leviathan [Satan] is snared. Because the devil is proud, he cannot understand Christ’s humility and so believes he tempts and kills a mere man. But in inflicting a sinless man with death, the devil loses his rights over man from his “excess of presumption,” Christ conquers the devil’s kingdom of sin, liberating captives from the devil’s tyranny. Order is reinstated when man returns to serve God, his true master.” (1)
    Christus Victor (Christ the Victor)
    The Christus victor theory is closely tied to the ransom theory. It was articulated by Swedish theologian Gustaf Aulen. Aulen argued that payment to Satan is not the focus of the classical theory. Rather, the focus is on Jesus liberating humanity from the power of death and sin.

    Adherants
    The Eastern Orthodox church holds to the ransom view. Many in the Western church find it helpful, but most do not accept it as a stand alone view.

    Criticisms of the Ransom Theory:
    • Not enough focus on God
    • makes God a debtor to Satan.
    • Tricking Satan seems to imply deceit on God's part.
    Verses Used to Advocate the Ransom Theory:

    • For there is one God, and there is one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus, who gave himself as a ransom for all, which is the testimony given at the proper time. 1 Timothy 2:56
    • You were bought at a price. Therefore honor God with your body. 1 Corinthians 6:20
    • For even the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many -Mark 10:45
    • For he has rescued us from the dominion of darkness and brought us into the kingdom of the Son he loves, in whom we have redemption, the forgiveness of sins. -Colossians 1:13-14
    Examples in music and literature:
    • The Champion (Carman) - Jesus defeats Satan in a cosmic battle represented by a boxing match.
    (1) Quoted from The Story of Christian Theology, by Roger Olson, page 323
    LINK

    ---

    We didn't watch this video  in class yet, but it should help:




    Do you see BOTH Christus Victor and Penal Substitution in this text?:
     Colossians 2 13 When you were dead in your sins and in the uncircumcision of your flesh, God made you[d] alive with Christ. He forgave us all our sins, 14 having canceled the charge of our legal indebtedness, which stood against us and condemned us; he has taken it away, nailing it to the cross. 15 And having disarmed the powers and authorities, he made a public spectacle of them, triumphing over them by the cross.[e]

    heopoedia: Theories of Atonment (click)
    ---
    Wiki:


    ---
      see also:


    --

    Christus Victor (Christ the Victor) is a view of the atonement taken from the title of Gustaf Aulén’s groundbreaking book, first published in 1931, where he drew attention back to the early church’s Ransom theory. In Christus Victor, the atonement is viewed as divine conflict and victory over the hostile powers that hold humanity in subjection. Aulén argues that the classic Ransom theory is not so much a rational systematic theory as it is a drama, a passion story of God triumphing over the powers and liberating humanity from the bondage of sin. As Gustav Aulén writes, “the work of Christ is first and foremost a victory over the powers which hold mankind in bondage: sin, death, and the devil.”[1]
    The Ransom Theory was predominant in the early church and for the first thousand years of church history and supported by all Greek Church Fathers from Irenaeus to John of Damascus. To mention only the most important names OrigenAthanasiusBasil the GreatGregory of NyssaGregory of Nazianzus, and John Chrysostom. The Christus Victor view was also dominant among the Latin Fathers of the Patristic period including AmbroseAugustineLeo the Great, and Gregory the Great.
    A major shift occurred when Anselm of Canterbury published his Cur Deos Homoaround 1097 AD which marks the point where the predominate understanding of the atonement shifted from the ransom theorySatisfaction Doctrine in the Roman Catholic Church and subsequently the Protestant Church. The Eastern Orthodox Church still holds to the Ransom or Christus Victor view. This is built upon the understanding of the atonement put forward by Irenaeus, called “recapitulation”.[2]
    to the
    As the term Christus Victor indicates, the idea of “ransom” should not be seen in terms (as Anselm did) of a business transaction, but more of a rescue or liberation of humanity from the slavery of sin. Unlike the Satisfaction or Penal-substitution views of the atonement rooted in the idea of Christ paying the penalty of sin to satisfy the demands of justice, the Christus Victor view is rooted in the incarnation and how Christ entered into human misery and wickedness and thus redeemed it. Irenaeus called this “Recapitulation” (re-creation). As it is often expressed: “Jesus became what we are so that we could become what he is”.  LINK
     --

    Christus Victor texts:

    Matthew 12:28 (drop down Luke 11:20)


    Mark 10:45


    Luke 4: 1-21

     John 1:4-5



    John 12:31-33


    Romans 5:15-21

    Romans 8:31-39


    Romans 16:19 

    1 Corinthians 2:6-7 

    2 Corinthians 10:3-5

    Ephesians 1: 19-23


    Ephesians 4: 7-10 

    Ephesians 6:12


    Colossians 1:13-14


    Colossians 2:8-19


    Hebrews 2:14


    1 Peter 3:21-22


    I John 3:8 



    ----------------------------------------------------



  • believe or act
  • Fox or CNN
  • John Lennon or Paul McCartney
  • Ginger of Mary Ann
  • Dick York or Dick Sargaent
  • Peter Fuhrler or  Michael Tait
  • children or adults
  • Israel or Palestine
  • bounded set or centrered set
  • Stockdale or Rosedale
  •   or usted
  • upside down or downside up

kkk
8)Subversion of empir

Subversion of empire:

We defined this by watching the video below..
to get the power of HISTORICAL WORLD..
We looked at  Matt. 2:1a, and the historical world image of the Herodian fortress, in whose shadow was  Jesus).  YOU CAN WATCH our VanDer Laan  "In the Shadow of Herod" video HERE in two parts:



video


video
VanDer Laan writes:




THE MASTER BUILDER
There was another side to Herod. His visionary building programs, his ingenious development of trade with the rest of the world, and his advancement of the interests of his nation are legendary. Many of his building projects were designed to strengthen the loyalty of his subjects, a goal he never achieved. Most seem to have been built to strengthen his relationship with Rome and to establish himself as the greatest king the Jews had ever had. Herod built on a magnificent and grandiose scale. His building projects included:

The Herodion: This mountain fortress overlooked the town of Bethlehem. Standing on a high hill, the upper fortress was round and more than 200 feet in diameter. Originally, it was seven stories high, with an eastern tower that stood more than 40 feet higher. Packed dirt covered the first four stories, giving the upper fortress a cone shape. Inside were a peristyle garden, reception hall, Roman baths, and countless apartments. The lower palace included an enormous pool, a colonnaded garden, a 600-foot-long terrace, and a building more than 400 feet long. The Herodion was the third-largest palace in the ancient world....

....The visitor cannot help being impressed with Herod's vision and ingenuity. However, all that remain are spectacular ruins, because Herod lived for Herod. By contrast, another builder, a humble carpenter born in Bethlehem, used a different material than did Herod (Matt. 16:181 Peter 2:4-8). Jesus' buildevings continue to grow because He built for the glory of God. Like David (1 Sam. 17:46), Elijah (1 Kings 18:36), and Hezekiah (Isa. 37:20), He lived so that the world may know that Yahweh, the God of Israel, is truly God. His construction projects will last forever because He built for the glory of God the Father. -link                                        


VanDer Laan's website is a great resource..it's here.